Structures of Ferguson: Race, History, and Mobilization

Featured Panelists Frank Baumgartner (UNC, Political Science), Mai Nguyen (UNC, City and Regional Planning), Donna Marie Winn (Frank Porter Graham Child Dev Inst), Blair Kelley (NCSU, Dept of History), and Ted Shaw (UNC, School of Law, Ctr for Civil Rights)

The recent killing of the young African American male, Mike Brown, and related events in Ferguson, Missouri were at the center of a September 8th panel discussion co-hosted by the IAAR and the Center for Urban and Regional Studies. Charged with examining underlying factors that gave rise to the situation in Ferguson, an interdisciplinary panel of Triangle scholars highlighted the persistence of race, racialization and racial discrimination in American structures and sensibilities. Referencing Gunnar Myrdal’s famous tome, panelist Ted Shaw (UNC Professor of Law and director of the Center for Civil Rights), proclaimed: “Race is the great American Dilemma.” Some also saw resonance with racial profiling and police engagement with racial and ethnic minorities in North Carolina. The event drew in a crowd of over 100 students, faculty and staff, who dialogued with the panel about possibilities for social change and lessons to be drawn from Ferguson.  Featured Panelists were Frank Baumgartner (UNC, Political Science), Mai Nguyen (UNC, City and Regional Planning), Donna Marie Winn (Frank Porter Graham Child Dev Inst), Blair Kelley (NCSU, Dept of History), and Ted Shaw (UNC, School of Law, Ctr for Civil Rights).