Graduate Student Summer Research Grant

The Graduate Student Summer Research Grant (GSSRG) provides funding to masters, predoctoral and professional graduate students in any discipline who are conducting research as part of their degree requirements. Students’ research projects must concern African Americans or the broader African diaspora and have clear relevance to IAAR’s mission. Students must also be in good standing and have completed four semesters of graduate coursework toward a doctoral or two semesters of coursework toward a masters degree at UNC-Chapel Hill. Research must be carried out between the summer months of May-August. The program was launched in 2015 and awarded seven small grants to graduate students in anthropology, art, environmental engineering, history library science, psychology and public health, environmental science. All award recipients will present results and progress in their projects through IAAR’s Graduate Student Brown Bag Lecture Series.


2018-2019 Graduate Visiting Scholar

Tracie Canada is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Virginia and holds a B.A. in Cultural Anthropology and Spanish from Duke University. She is currently working on her dissertation, where she explores the everyday lived experiences of Black college football players. Her work shows that these players’ conceptualizations of their unique positionality affects their daily pursuits on and off the football field, as they inhabit Black, male, athletic bodies. She argues for the vital importance of kin and social relations, especially with mothers and fellow football teammates, for players’ successful navigation of not just game days, but the everyday. Tracie has conducted research for this project with support from various agencies, including the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, the National Science Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

 

2018 GSSRG Recipients

CLAIRE CHIPMAN
Department of Sociology
The Choices and Burdens of Diverse Spaces: An Ethnographic Analysis

BRIONCA TAYLOR
Department of Sociology
Publicly Pushed Out: Race and Disability in Alternative Schools for Suspended Students

HENRY WILLIS
Department of Psychology
Developing a Mobile Mental Health Application for African American Young Adults

Past Graduate Student Summer Research Recipients

2017

YANICA FAUSTIN
UNC Global Public Heath, Maternal & Child Health
Black Nativity & Birth Outcomes

SONNY KELLY
Department of Communications
My Life Matters

CAROLINE NEWHALL
Department of History
A War of Massacres and Confusions: Black POWs of the Civil War

2016

LONEKE BLACKMAN
Department of Nutrition
Sisters in Health: A Weight Loss Health Program for African American Women

SAMANTHA KING
Department of Anthropology
Gender and Strategic Invisibility in an Afro-Caribbean Food Economy

ALEX MCVEY
Department of Communication
Visual Rhetoric of Antiblackness and Policing in the ‘Post-Racial’ Conjuncture of the Obama Presidency

MISHIO YAMANAKA
Department of History
Race and Public Education in New Orleans: A Case Study of the Fillmore School, 1856-1978

2015

ADAM BLEDSOE
Department of Geography
Brazilian Quilombos: Historical and Contemporary Struggles

ALLEN BUANSI
School of Law
Genetics in Law Enforcement: Potential Hazards for African Americans and Latinos

SHELBY DAWKINS-LAW
School of Education
Student Perspectives of Resegregation in NC Public Schools

DIANE FRANCIS
School of Media and Journalism
Condom Distribution and Safer Sex Messaging Intervention Targeting Young Black College Women

ALLISON MATHEWS
Department of Sociology
Searching for ‘Whosoever’ Ministries: Examining Black Gay Men’s Church-going Decisions

2014

LIZ ADAMS
Department of Pyschology
The Developmental Influence of Skin Tone in the Lives of African American Youth

ORISANMI BURTON
Department of Anthropology
“Guided by Experience”: Black Radicalism and the Contemporary Prison Resistance Movement

ATIYA HUSAIN
Department of Sociology
Race and Muslims in the Post-Civil Rights Era