Traffic Stops in Black and White – A Lecture by Dr. Frank R. Baumgartner

Dr. Frank Baumgartner, Richard J. Richardson Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, speaks to the UNC community about racial disparities in traffic stops. Based on analyses of all traffic stops in North Carolina from 2002-2013, Dr. Baumgartner shows that Black male drivers are 75% more likely to… Read more »

African American Children, Academic Achievement & Parental Involvement

                  Dr. Iheoma U. Iruka, Director of Research and Evaluation at the Buffett Early Child Institute at the University Nebraska discusses the role of parental participation in the academic success of African American children in her talk “Pathway to Excellence for Black Children?: Critical Examination of Family… Read more »

Structures of Ferguson: Race, History, and Mobilization

The recent killing of the young African American male, Mike Brown, and related events in Ferguson, Missouri were at the center of a September 8th panel discussion co-hosted by the IAAR and the Center for Urban and Regional Studies. Charged with examining underlying factors that gave rise to the situation in Ferguson, an interdisciplinary panel… Read more »

IAAR Faculty Fellows Announced

The Institute of African American Research is pleased to announce the two recipients of the first–ever IAAR Faculty Fellowship: Enrique Neblett and Alvaro Reyes. Both are UNC faculty members. They will be fellows with the IAAR for the academic year 2014-2015, during which time they will work on developing or completing their individual research projects…. Read more »

Behind The Whirlwind

Director’s note: A colleague in anthropology recently directed me to a new graduate zine, The Whirlwind, on race and geography and I was instantly struck by its remarkable content and innovative format. I knew or knew of many of the publication’s contributors, most who have attended or expressed interest in IAAR events. And I have… Read more »

“Let’s Talk About HIV”: Middle Class Black Women’s Self-Advocacy in Patient-Provider Communication

Allison Mathews, our guest blogger, is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology and Humphreys Fellow with the Graduate School at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her dissertation research focuses on the role that Black and gay identity play in Black gay men’s religious choice and participation. Her research interests include race and ethnicity, masculinity and sexuality,… Read more »

Centralizing the Griot in Space and Time: The Practice of Spatial Literacy

Tanya Shields, our featured IAAR blogger, is an assistant professor in UNC’s Department of Women’s and Gender Studies.  Dr. Shields’s first book, Bodies and Bones: Feminist Rehearsal and Imagining Caribbean Belonging, is forthcoming with the University of Virginia Press and examines the ways in which rehearsing historical events and archetypal characters shapes belonging to the… Read more »

African American English and Embracing Linguistic Diversity in the Classroom

Jen Griffin, our featured guest blogger for February, is a doctoral candidate in the Linguistics Department at UNC. Her research interests include the documentation of dialect variation and evaluating models of variation. Her dissertation project seeks to document the various dialects of Sgaw Karen, which is an understudied language spoken by members of the Karen… Read more »

Mentorship and Professional Development for Researchers of African Americans and the African Diaspora

No one disputes that mentorship and network-building are the stuff of professional development for young scholars and students. Arguably, mentoring is especially important in interdisciplinary fields such as African American and African diaspora studies, an area of scholarship that some consider less legitimate than “traditional” disciplines (see Robin Kelley’s recent article on this) and that… Read more »